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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

4 edition of Human oncogenic viruses found in the catalog.

Human oncogenic viruses

J.-H. James Ou

Human oncogenic viruses

by J.-H. James Ou

  • 136 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by World Scientific in New Jersey .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Herpesviruses,
  • Hepatitis viruses,
  • Oncogenic Viruses,
  • Oncogenic viruses,
  • Physiology,
  • Pathogenicity

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementeditors Jing-Hsiung James Ou, T. S. Benedict Yen
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR372.O6 H85 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 339 p. :
    Number of Pages339
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24883208M
    ISBN 109812833463
    ISBN 109789812833464
    LC Control Number2010455091
    OCLC/WorldCa234427100

    Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) a.k.a. Kaposi's sarcoma virus HHV-8 was first detected in by analysis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) tissues from a patient with AIDS HHV8 differs from other human herpes viruses in that has a limited uneven distribution within the population. Purchase Essential Human Virology - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN ,

    Cancer virus, tumor virus Oncology A DNA virus or RNA virus capable of causing malignant transformation of cells, inducing a neoplasia in its host or causally linked to human tumors. Oncogenic viruses include Retroviruses, eg leukemia viruses of cats, cattle, chickens; Herpesviruses, eg EBV-induced Burkitt's lymphoma, Asiatic nasopharyngeal. It is well known that 15–20% of all human neoplasms have a viral cause, that is, they are developed due to so‐called oncogenic viruses. The experts of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) consider the following viruses as human oncogenic viruses: RNA viruses: Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV) causing hepatocellular.

      New Research on Oncogenic Viruses 1st Edition by Beatriz Gonzalez-Yebra (Author), Guelaguetza Vazquez-Ortiz (Author), Mona Johannessen (Author), & ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important?. 1 Chapter 6 - Virology • Topics –Structure –Classification –Multiplication –Cultivation and replication –Nonviral infectious agent –Teratogenic/Oncogenic - Viruses have a host is, viruses infect specific cells or tissues of specific hosts, or specific bacteria, or specific plants.


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Human oncogenic viruses by J.-H. James Ou Download PDF EPUB FB2

System Upgrade on Fri, Jun 26th, at 5pm (ET) During this period, our website will be offline for less than an hour but the E-commerce and registration of new users may not be available for up to 4 hours. Get this from a library. Human oncogenic viruses.

[J Human oncogenic viruses book James Ou; T S Benedict Yen;] -- "Viruses are the causes of approximately 25% of human cancers. Due to their importance in carcinogenesis, there is a desperate need for a book Human oncogenic viruses book discusses these viruses.

This book. This text will explore the known molecular genetic, biolog­ ical, and clinical knowledge of selected human neoplasms that demonstrate association with suspected oncogenic virus and those cytogenetic alterations that either cause or are caused by oncogene activation.

This book serves as an excellent text in comparative virology, with an up-to-data overview and detail for each group of DNA tumor viruses. The authors review the common and diverse mechanisms of action of the transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. In addition, the book covers the individual aspects of seven oncogenic viruses, i.e., hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus, and Merkel cell polyomavirus, and the related human cancers.

Oncogenic DNA Viruses. Oncogenic human DNA viruses include hepatitis B viruses, herpesviruses, and papillomaviruses. Their mechanisms of replication and epidemiology are considered in each of the specific chapters describing these viruses.

The early, organ-specific diagnosis of malignancy continues to be a major unmet medical need. Clearly the ability to establish an early diagnosis of cancer is dependent upon an intimate knowledge of the cancer's biology, which if understood.

These are the oncogenic virus (otherwise known as oncoviruses or tumor viruses). The hamster tumor cells produce no infective virus.

Human polyoma viruses The first two human polyoma isolates, known as BK and JC were discovered in Neither came from a tumor. BK came from the urine of a kidney transplant patient and JC came from the.

Oncogenic DNA viruses, in contrast, are an etiological factor in a significant portion of human cancers. Recent technological advancements have facilitated the identification of DNA oncogenic viruses and the types of tumors they produce, and these numbers are likely to grow.

Oncogenic DNA viruses use a great variety of transformation mechanisms. Molecular Virology of Human Pathogenic Viruses presents robust coverage of the key principles of molecular virology while emphasizing virus family structure and providing key context points for topical advances in the field.

The book is organized in a logical manner to aid in student discoverability and comprehension and is based on the author. Human oncogenic viruses rely on persistence to disseminate and thus deploy powerful immune evasion programs to establish long-term infections.

As part of their replication and immune evasion strategies, human oncoviruses have evolved powerful anti-apoptotic and proliferative programs that can directly induce cancer hallmarks in the infected. human oncogenic viruses and the molecular mechanisms that lead to tumorigenesis in humans.

Keywords: cellular immunity, epidemiology, immunomodulators, host–virus. Recently, the ability of oncogenic viruses to alter autophagy, a catabolic process activated during the innate immune response to infections, is emerging as a key event for the onset of human cancers.

Get this from a library. Human oncogenic viruses. [J -H James Ou; T S Benedict Yen;] -- Viruses are the causes of approximately 25% of human cancers. Due to their importance in carcinogenesis, there is a desperate need for a book that discusses these viruses.

This book. Quick Search in Books. Enter words / phrases / DOI / ISBN / keywords / authors / etc. Search. Quick Search anywhere. Enter words / phrases / DOI / ISBN / keywords / authors / etc. Search. Quick search in Citations. Journal Year Volume Issue Page.

Search. Advanced Search. 6 My Cart. Sign in. Skip main navigation. Human Papillomaviruses Human papillomaviruses are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect the epithelium.

More than HPV types have been identified; they are differentiated by the genetic sequence of the outer capsid protein L1. Most HPV types infect the cutaneous epithelium and can cause common skin warts. Other articles where Oncogenic virus is discussed: carcinogen: A number of viruses are suspected of causing cancer in animals, including humans, and are frequently referred to as oncogenic viruses.

Examples include human papillomaviruses, the Epstein-Barr virus, and the hepatitis B virus, all of which have genomes made up of DNA.

Human T-cell leukemia virus. An oncovirus is a virus that can cause term originated from studies of acutely transforming retroviruses in the –60s, when the term "oncornaviruses" was used to denote their RNA virus origin.

With the letters "RNA" removed, it now refers to any virus with a DNA or RNA genome causing cancer and is synonymous with "tumor virus" or "cancer virus". Although individual human tumour viruses exert their malignant effects in different ways, there are common features that illuminate mechanisms of oncogenesis more generally, whether or not there is a viral aetiology.

This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. Oncogenic viruses. Viruses that cause cancer.

Sometimes also called tumour viruses. However, some tumour viruses, such as adenovirus and polyomavirus SV40 promote tumorigenesis in other organisms. Human oncogenic viruses. Ed. by Jing-Hsiung James Ou and T.S.

Benedict Yen. World Scientific pages $ Hardcover QR Seven contributions offer a concise, up-to-date review of viruses that cause cancer (and are .ONCOGENIC VIRUSES - RNA TUMOR VIRUSES (Retroviruses) Viruses that cause cancer and the mechanisms by which they do so: DNA cancer viruses (polyoma, herpes, papilloma, hepatitis, adenovirus).

RNA cancer viruses (retroviruses) CHAPTER SEVEN Human Immunodeficiency Virus. PART I HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS AND AIDS.A number of viruses are suspected of causing cancer in animals, including humans, and are frequently referred to as oncogenic viruses.

Examples include human papillomaviruses, the Epstein-Barr virus, and the hepatitis B virus, all of which have genomes made up of DNA.